In honour of the martyrs, General Mihailovic and Czar Nicholas

July 17th every year is a day of sad reflection for patriotic Serbs and Russians. That is the date, in 1946 and 1918 respectively, when General Mihailovic and Emperor Nicholas II were murdered.

General Dragoljub Mihailovic is the greatest and most slandered Serb of our time. Fanatically maligned by his malicious executioners, there is nothing about him that is in the least disputable. Everything is impeccable and beyond reproach.

General Mihailovic is the target of pathological hatred of the contemptible Counter-Serbia because he is the antithesis of all its vices and personification of highest virtue and purest patriotism.

The calmness and long-suffering of Serbia’s most decorated military officer in the hour of his Golgotha even a monk would be challenged to emulate. But lo! The greatest Serbian knight in shining armour of our time was born and reached his apogee in the least chivalrous period of the long and epic history of his people.

General Mihailovic was in Serbia the same final flash of goodness and virtue, on the eve of many decades of darkness, that the noble czar Nicholas II was in Russia. They were of entirely different backgrounds, but were of the same moral and spiritual cast. Providence ordained that just before descending into the long night both the Serbian and the Russian people would be brightly illuminated by the noblest virtue accessible this side of eternity, as a certain sign and reliable promise of future redemption.

Both the General’s and the Emperor’s guiding ideal was service to the nation entrusted to each in the midst of global cataclysms of their times and not of their making. Their fickle contemporaries were ill-equipped morally to value their sacrificial service, appreciating it but superficially. Obsessed by chimeras, intimidated by brutal terror, and corrupted by deceptive this worldly enticements, many of them willingly repressed the shining image of their undeserved champions, embracing instead the criminal doctrines of the executioners, singing to them for decades tawdry and servile dithyrambs.

Yes, that bitter truth pronounced by the Emperor, once he grasped the implacable laws of this valley of tears, that he was surrounded by perfidy, cowardice, and treason, the General on his part could have forcefully affirmed, with as much justification and equally deep conviction.

General Mihailovic and czar Nicholas are key personages for the moral renewal and grace-filled future of both Serbian and Russian people. By sidestepping them, neither the Serbs nor the Russians will be able to take even a modest step forward, nor will they ever manage to loosen the chains which bind them.

 

 

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